Search

What is Feline High-Rise Syndrome?

Updated: Apr 15

Although we often consider cats to be adept climbers and agile balancers, falls from apartment buildings that result in serious injury or death are all too common. The phenomenon is so common that there is even a name for it: feline high-rise syndrome.



Version française ci-dessous



Image: Canva

Most cats instinctually seek high places from which to survey their surroundings. Cats in the wild will do this to find the best vantage point from which to see both their predators and prey and it is a behaviour that naturally continues in domesticated cats. Although we often consider cats to be adept climbers and agile balancers, falls from apartment buildings - balconies, windows, window ledges, fire escapes etc. - that result in serious injury or death are all too common. The phenomenon is so common that there is even a name for it: feline high-rise syndrome. The term was coined by a group of vets in New York and it specifically refers to the behaviour seen in cats where they seek high places, notably above the second floor or around 7-9 metres height, and somehow manage to fall and suffer injury.


Remarkably, studies show that the large majority of cats survive their fall however, there are a commonly-observed set of injuries seen as a result, and the definition of the syndrome also encompasses the medical consequences of the fall. These injuries include thoracic and internal organ trauma, head and facial trauma and limb fractures and dislocations, which are life-threatening in around 30% of cases and require urgent medical treatment. Any cat who has suffered a significant fall should be assessed by a veterinarian, even if there is no obvious injury. Interestingly, it has been observed that injuries resulting from falls from a lesser height are often more serious than those from heights above 7 floors (approximately 20 metres) and there are theories to explain this apparent irregularity. One is that once a falling cat has engaged its 'righting reflex' and relaxed from a tense body position into a "parachute" position there is a slowing of their rate of fall and a greater surface area to absorb impact, resulting in less injury. Smaller falls theoretically do not give the cat enough time to adopt this parachute position.


There may be many reasons why a fall occurs, including simply losing balance, being spooked, involuntary REM (deep) sleep movements, attempting to catch prey or chasing insects, fights or play between cats, illness and lack of maturity and life experience in comprehending dangers (one study showed that almost 60% of cats who fell were under 12 months old). Additionally, unsterilised cats are theoretically more susceptible to erratic, risky behaviour through hormonal changes and mating impulses. Yet another reason to sterilise your beloved felines! Feline high-rise syndrome is clearly preventable. Please consider securing or preventing cat access to roofs, terraces, verandahs, balconies, windows, window ledges, fire escapes etc. If you are unable to adequately secure these areas, please consider attaching your cat to a harness and leash. Finally, please spay and neuter your cats to help avoid the risky behaviour that may lead to falls.


Have something to say about feline high-rise syndrome? Add your voice in the comments below or send us a message to catventurous.community@gmail.com.



Charlotte & Melba




Qu'est-ce que le syndrome du chat parachutiste ?


Bien que nous considérions souvent les chats comme des grimpeurs habiles et des équilibristes agiles, les chutes depuis les hauteurs des immeubles entraînent fréquemment des blessures graves ou la mort. Le phénomène est si répandu qu’on lui attribue même un nom : le syndrome du chat parachutiste.



Image: Canva


La plupart des chats cherchent instinctivement des endroits élevés pour mieux surveiller leur environnement. Les chats sauvages le font pour trouver le meilleur point d'observation sur leurs prédateurs ou leurs proies et c'est un comportement qui se poursuit naturellement chez les chats domestiques.


Bien que nous considérons souvent les chats comme des grimpeurs habiles et des équilibristes agiles, les chutes depuis les hauteurs des immeubles - balcons, fenêtres, rebords de fenêtres, issues de secours, etc. - qui entraînent des blessures graves ou la mort sont trop fréquentes. Le phénomène est si commun qu'il porte même un nom : le syndrome du chat parachutiste. Le terme a été inventé par un groupe de vétérinaires de New York et se réfère spécifiquement au comportement observé chez les chats qui cherchent des endroits élevés, notamment au-dessus du deuxième étage ou entre 7 et 9 mètres de hauteur, et qui chutent et se blessent.


Fait remarquable : des études montrent que la grande majorité des chats survivent à leur chute, y compris depuis de grandes hauteurs. Il y a évidemment un ensemble de blessures communément observées qui en résultent, et la définition du syndrome englobe également les conséquences médicales de la chute. Ces lésions comprennent des traumatismes thoraciques et des organes internes, des traumatismes crâniens et faciaux, des fractures et dislocations des membres ; tous peuvent mettre la vie des chats en danger et nécessitent un traitement médical urgent. Ainsi, tout chat qui a subi une chute importante devrait être examiné par un vétérinaire, même s'il n'y a pas de blessure apparente.


Il est intéressant de noter que les blessures résultant de chutes d'une hauteur inférieure sont souvent plus graves que celles qui surviennent au-dessus de 7 étages (environ 20 mètres) et il existe des théories pour expliquer cette apparente singularité. L'une d'entre elles est que dès qu'un chat en chute a engagé son " réflexe de redressement ", qu'il est ainsi passé d'une position corporelle tendue à une position de " parachute ", sa vitesse de chute diminue et sa surface d'absorption des chocs augmente, ce qui réduit le risque de blessures a l'arrivée. Les petites chutes ne donnent théoriquement pas assez de temps au chat pour adopter cette position de parachute.