Search

How To Harness and Leash Train Your Cat: Our Top 5 Tips

Updated: Feb 8

How can you successfully teach your kitty to become comfortable with being on a harness and leash? Find our top 5 tips below.

Version française ci-dessous

Image: Shutterstock


1. Start as early as possible (but it's never too late!)

In general, the earlier you can start familiarising your kitty with a harness and leash the better. A young kitten will usually adapt more quickly and more easily to wearing a harness than an adult cat. The ideal time to begin is around 8 – 12 weeks of age, making the most of the time indoors before all vaccinations are completed.


It is important to remember from the very beginning that a cat is not a dog and will not behave on a leash as a dog would. Humans don’t usually walk their cats; cats walk their humans! It will pay off in the bond of confidence and trust you nurture with your cat to keep your expectations realistic and guided by the character and needs of your individual cat. Some cats will never adapt to a harness and leash and that's ok!


However, with time and patience, cats of any age with promisingly catventurous personality characteristics and a secure bond with their human can be taught to walk outside on harness and leash and can reap all the wonderful life enrichment benefits of doing so. It's never too late!



With time and patience, cats of any age with promisingly catventurous personality characteristics and a secure bond with their human can be taught to walk outside on harness and leash and can reap all the wonderful life enrichment benefits of doing so. It's never too late!


2. Find a quality harness and leash

Do your research and find an 'escape-proof', cat-specific body harness that is comfortable, fits well and that will distribute forces around the chest and body of your cat. There are a wide variety of specialty feline harnesses and cat jackets available, so take the time to find one that suits you and your cat. Where you can, invest in products with high-quality clasps and other attachments. Check out our guide to choosing a cat harness here and our breakdown of the 4 main types of harnesses available here.


If you are beginning harness and leash training with a kitten keep in mind that you will likely need to find a smaller harness for use until around 6 - 8 months of age and then to graduate to an adult harness (assuming all goes well!).


Important: Never use a collar and leash for cats as you might for a dog. Collars with any force placed on them can damage a cat’s neck and throat.


3. Start indoors

Once you have found a harness and leash that suits, leave it in areas that are familiar and safe for your cat. Let them sniff it and play with it so they immediately associate it with fun activities and can imprint it with their own scent. Over a period of days (or however long it takes), continue the fun by accompanying periods of harness wearing with plenty of food, treats and/or attention, including distracting your cat with food as you put on and adjust the harness.


Start with short, regular periods of wearing just the harness (no leash) and slowly increase the length of time your kitty wears it. Let your cat dictate the length of time this process takes – it may take days or even weeks for him/her to feel comfortable and, ideally, not even notice the harness. Eventually, you can attach a leash to the harness and let your cat feel the weight of the leash by dragging it behind him/her (a treats trail may be useful here!) and then try walking him/her inside on leash.


The key thing to keep in mind is to always associate the harness and leash, as best you can, with positive experiences. Avoid punishing your cat while he/she is wearing the harness and do not drag them on leash against their will. Make harness and leash wearing as fun and affirmative as you can!


As part of your indoor preparation period, introduce your kitty to the backpack or carrier that will be their ‘safe space’ when they eventually go outdoors. Let them have access to it, sleep in it and imprint it with their scent so they have a sense of ownership over it as part of their territory when you eventually head outdoors.



The key thing to keep in mind is to always associate the harness and leash, as best you can, with positive experiences.


4. Plan and prepare to start catventuring outdoors

Once you feel that both you and your cat are ready to try outdoor catventures, plan and prepare for a short outing. Ensure that your cat is up to date on vaccinations and flea and parasite management and is microchipped before you head out. If your cat is over 6 months of age, it is preferable if he/she is neutered or spayed. Consider the comfort and safety items you might need once outside – portable bowl, food, treats, water, poo bags, basic first aid kit, collar and ID tag etc.


It is a good idea to establish a routine of taking your cat outside already harnessed and leashed and inside their carrier so they understand that whenever they go outside this is how it happens. If your cat becomes excited about going outside, he/she might become a ‘door dasher’, so establish a well-defined routine from the beginning. Cats generally respond well to a routine so start how you wish to continue! This will also allow you to always have his/her ‘safe space’ with you, which your cat can retreat to for any reason when you are outside. It is also handy for when/if you encounter off-leash dogs or any other hazard; your cat can be placed inside the carrier and out of danger.


Start with short, regular outings that both you and your cat are comfortable with. Five minutes might be plenty to start. Preferably, go out on dry days so there are plenty of scents to keep your cat both stimulated and able to get his/her bearings. Stay in tune with your cat’s body language and energy while out and intervene early wherever necessary by, for example, letting them take the time to sniff around, taking regular breaks if your cat wants to rest, offering him/her water, having his/her safe space always available, heading home early if necessary etc. Reward the behaviour that you want to nurture with treats and/or attention while outside and ignore the behaviour you don’t. Successful harness and leash training a cat usually takes time and patience to build confidence and trust but the rewards are tremendous for both you and your cat.



Successful harness and leash training a cat usually takes time and patience to build confidence and trust but the rewards are tremendous for both you and your cat.


5. Explore new and fun ways to be catventurous

Depending on your lifestyle, you can slowly start to include your catventurer in increasingly catventurous activities. Some kitties are content to simply explore a backyard or a local park safely on harness and leash but some kitties will take to road tripping, travelling in planes, trains and buses, camping, hiking, kayaking, boating, rock climbing, swimming etc. Whatever you decide to introduce as new experiences for you and your cat, stick with the basic principles of going at your cat’s pace, not forcing him/her to do something they really don’t want to do, always have their safe space available to them and add plenty of gentle encouragement and positive reinforcement to every outing.



What has helped you to harness and leash train your cat? Add your voice and share your thoughts with other members of Catventurous community by commenting below or send us an email at catventurous.community@gmail.com.



Charlotte & Melba


Comment apprendre à tenir son chat en laisse : nos 5 meilleurs conseils


Comment réussir à enseigner à votre chat afin qu'il soit à l'aise avec un harnais et une laisse ? Trouvez nos 5 meilleurs conseils ci-dessous !



Image: Dids on Pexels

1. Commencer le plus tôt possible (même s'il n'est jamais trop tard !)


En général, plus tôt vous pouvez commencer à familiariser votre chaton avec un harnais et une laisse, mieux c'est. Un chaton s'adaptera généralement plus rapidement et plus facilement au port d'un harnais qu'un chat adulte. Le moment idéal pour commencer est vers l'âge de 8 à 12 semaines, en profitant du temps passé à l'intérieur avant que toutes les vaccinations soient effectuées.


Il est important de se rappeler dès le début qu'un chat n'est pas un chien et ne se comportera pas en laisse comme le ferait un chien. Les humains ne promènent généralement pas leurs chats ; les chats promènent leurs humains ! Le lien de confiance que vous entretenez avec votre chat vous permettra de garder vos attentes réalistes et guidées par le caractère de votre chat. Certains chats ne s'adapteront jamais à un harnais et à une laisse et c'est normal !


Cependant, avec du temps et de la patience, les chats de tout âge qui présentent des caractéristiques de personnalité prometteuses et qui bénéficient d'un lien sûr avec leurs humains peuvent apprendre à sortir avec un harnais et une laisse. Ils peuvent ainsi profiter de tous les avantages de la vie et se sentir épanouis. Il n'est jamais trop tard !



Avec du temps et de la patience, les chats de tout âge qui présentent des caractéristiques de personnalité prometteuses et qui bénéficient d'un lien sûr avec leurs humains peuvent apprendre à sortir avec un harnais et une laisse.



2. Trouver un harnais et une laisse de qualité spécifiquement adaptés aux chats


Faites vos recherches et trouvez un harnais à l'épreuve des évasions, spécifiquement adapté aux chats. Il faut qu'il soit confortable, bien ajusté et qu'il répartisse les forces autour de la poitrine et du corps de votre chat. Il existe une grande variété de harnais et de vestes pour chats, alors prenez le temps de trouver celui qui vous convient, à vous et à votre chat. Lorsque vous le pouvez, investissez dans des produits dotés de fermoirs et autres accessoires de haute qualité. Consultez notre guide sur le choix d'un harnais de chat ici et les descriptions des 4 principaux types de harnais disponibles ici.


Si vous commencez l'apprentissage du harnais et de la laisse avec un chaton, vous devrez très probablement trouver un petit harnais qui pourra être utilisé jusqu'à l'âge de 6 à 8 mois environ, puis passer à un harnais pour adulte (en supposant que tout se passe bien !).


Important : n'utilisez jamais un collier avec une laisse pour les chats comme vous le feriez pour un chien, car les colliers sur lesquels on exerce une quelconque force peuvent endommager le cou et la gorge du chat.


3. Débuter à l'intérieur


Une fois que vous avez trouvé un harnais et une laisse qui vous conviennent, laissez votre chat le renifler et jouer avec pour qu'il l'associe immédiatement à des activités de loisirs et puisse l'imprégner de sa propre odeur. Pendant plusieurs jours (ou aussi longtemps qu'il le faut), continuez à lui faire plaisir en accompagnant les périodes de port du harnais de nourriture, de friandises et/ou d'attention, y compris en distrayant votre chat avec de la nourriture pendant que vous mettez et ajustez le harnais.


Commencez par des périodes courtes et régulières où vous ne portez que le harnais (sans laisse) et augmentez lentement la durée pendant laquelle votre chat le porte. Laissez votre chat vous dicter la durée de ce processus - il se peut qu'il faille des jours, voire des semaines, pour qu'il se sente à l'aise et, idéalement, qu'il ne perçoive même plus le harnais. Enfin, vous pouvez attacher une laisse au harnais et laisser votre chat sentir le poids de celle-ci en la traînant derrière lui (une piste de friandises peut être utile ici !). Il ne vous reste plus qu'à le faire marcher en laisse, toujours en sécurité à l'intérieur.


L'essentiel est de toujours associer le harnais et la laisse, autant que possible, à des expériences positives. Évitez de punir votre chat lorsqu'il porte le harnais et la laisse et ne le traînez jamais en